You are visiting a Virtual Museum that honors all
Native American cultures and traditions

Location: The Internet

aboutus

 

The Museum's mission is to advance and share the experience and knowledge of what has happened in the past and what this has meant for Native peoples today; to preserve the memory of those who died or suffered; to offer comfort, support, encouragement and understanding; and to encourage its visitors to reflect upon the need for dignity of and respect among all peoples.

You are invited to explore this Virtual Museum at your leisure and visit us frequently.


OUR MISSION

The Native American Holocaust Museum's purpose is the documentation, study, and interpretation of Native American Holocaust history. It serves as a memorial to Native American Men, Women and Children that died or suffered or are suffering as a result of the Native American Holocaust. We define the Native American Holocaust as the systematic persecution and annihilation of Native American peoples through the colonization and assimilation process and concomitant invasion of our personal and tribal boundaries even after our death. The Museum's primary mission is to advance and share the experience and knowledge of what this horror has meant for Native peoples today; to preserve the memory of those who died or suffered; to offer comfort, support, encouragement and understanding; and to encourage its visitors to reflect upon the need for dignity of and respect among all peoples.

Millions of people indigenous to the borders of the United States of America and Canada died in the formation of these two countries. There were approximately 250,000 Native Americans alive in the year 1900. Today, in the United States alone, there are 7,876,568 (per US Census) Native American peoples of 562 federally recognized Nations (per BIA).

The remaining indigenous Nations are reestablishing themselves through education, economic development, and the exploration of what it means to be sovereign Nations. One fundamental campaign is reclaiming our identity. The constant objectification and dehumanization Native Americans suffer daily through the ridicule and caricaturing of our culture and our people is part of the continuing Holocaust. This Museum site is dedicated to ending the oppressive regime of silence - silence due to fear - fear for our continued individual and group survival. Our desire to work, live, and raise our families can no longer be an impediment to our call for fundamental human decency. Survival without dignity is not life.

We are not expendable.

The Museum is to comfort and help Native American peoples heal from the Holocaust experience so they can get on with their lives. Many non-Native peoples are not ready to recognize the impact of racism or silence in the face of physical and cultural genocide, prejudice, and present and historical racism. They, too, are severely affected though by the witnessing of the Holocaust and the trauma experienced by Native peoples. We have all been hurt. It is time for Native peoples to have a Museum dedicated to healing - a refuge, a sanctuary, a place of tolerance, understanding, unconditional love, encouragement and peace. We also need a safe haven from the constant free floating anxiety we endure as a result of our fear of racism, never knowing when or from where it will strike - whose sole purpose is to keep us on edge, to manipulate and control our minds, our hearts, our will and our lives.

The Museum will support and host many programs:
(1) ending the distribution of monies by the federal government to states with the expectation/requirement that a portion of those monies be spent on Indian Tribes in the State and urban Indians. It is uncertain which states are not passing such monies on to Indian Tribes in the State and urban Indian Health Clinics. In Colorado, there was no method or formula to guide the distribution process and counties were concerned that if distribution was made to Indian Tribes in the State and urban Indian Health Clinics, it would reduce the amount they receive. The US HHS Tribal Advisory Committee expressed its concern on this matter as well. It constitutes a breach of the fiduciary duty of the US HHS in not seeing that the monies are being appropriately used by the State for Indian Tribes in the State and urban Indian Health Clinics. The sad thing is the monies are in areas most critical to Tribes and urban Indians - diabetes, alcoholism, substance abuse, etc.; (LINK to News Article)
(2) the Indian Child Welfare Act; (LINK to Indian Child Welfare Act Guidelines)
(3) Native American sacred sites;
(4) Tribal Employment Rights Ordinances; and
(5) market value consideration for Tribal and Indian allottee resources.

On July 19, 2013, President Obama exercised his moral leadership of our Country, as did President Lincoln in abolishing slavery, to disavow racism as acceptable behavior in the United States of America. As can be seen from history, legislation is not enough. President Obama can serve as an exemplar.

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RESOURCES ON THIS SITE

We also provide resources, including:

Native American Resource Directories for Economic Development, Education, Health and a General list, including Congressional committees, federal agencies and the Native American Caucus of State Legislators list and State Indian Commissions list;

Native American Economic Development information, including PowerPoint Business Seminars for forming, developing and growing small businesses, including Small Business Administration government contracting, Federal Employment and Labor Laws, Contract Terminology and Marketing Your Art;

Native American Education information, including (i) Indian education curriculum materials; and (ii) Alternative Licensure Program requirements for persons interested in becoming teachers;

Native American law;

Key information by Kevin Gover, Assistant Secretary Indian Affairs, Statement on BIA; Mascot Articles, Civil Rights Commission Statement on Indian Mascots; Text of S.J. RES. 4: Apology to Native Peoples; Understanding and Working with Students and Adults from Poverty; White Privilege;

Real Estate and Native American Housing Programs, Indian Home Loan Guarantee Program, Housing and Urban Development Office of Native American Programs;

Energy information on oil and gas (World Shale, US Shale Maps); Bakken Formation Articles High Country, ProPublica; coal and renewable energy;

Perspectives on Contemporary Native American Issues; Cultural Racism; Notes on Navajo History; El Inca Garcilaso de la Vega (In Spanish) and El Cuartocentenario (In Spanish);

Survey on issues such as Colonial Trauma; Global Status of Women; Child Abuse; Teenage Pregnancies; Threatened Peoples; Media Stereotyping; Poverty; Mis-Education; Unemployment, Underemployment and Mis-Employment; Institutional Racism; Hate Crimes Today; Language Variation and Cultural Stereotyping; Health; Gangs; Crime; Incarceration; Suicide; Substance Abuse and Mental Illness; Violence by Intimates/Divorce; and Genocide;

Colonial texts by Christopher Columbus, Hernan Cortés and Bartolome de las Casas;

Native American art; and

Native American videos.

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THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY

The Native American Holocaust Memorial Day is a day that has been set aside for remembering the victims of the Native American Holocaust and for encouraging tolerance, understanding, and love among all peoples. It is also to remind us of the consequences of silence in the face of prejudice and racism. Those who witness the abuse of Native peoples suffer trauma as profound as the victim of the abuse. It is this knowledge that will help us put an end to prejudice and racism.

THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOLOCAUST HONOR SONG (COPYRIGHT, YAGNIZA, AUGUST 4, 2004)

We survived or we died.

In battle, in massacres, in prisoner-of-war camps, in forced marches, in cruel removal, in boarding schools, in re-location to cities, in termination of our tribes, in jails, in shame and despair, our deities mocked.

We survived or we died.

We survived or we died, our heroism forgotten.

In lives shattered by colonialism,
Stifled by oppression,
Shamed by assimilation,
Silenced by subjection,
We survived or we died.

We survived or we died, our valor overlooked.
In lives filled with hatred,
Bigotry,
Apathy,
Oblivion,
We survived or we died.

We survived or we died, our courage dismissed.

Unable to mourn the loss of lives,
Land and resources,
Culture,
Our continuing genocide.

We survived or we died.

We survived or we died, our strength ignored.
We are voices out of the darkness.
We are voices of honor.
We are voices of truth.
We are voices of life.
We are voices of hope.

Hear our pain.
Hear our suffering.
Hear our anguish.
Hear our despair.

In a perpetual state of grief,
We survived or we died.

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NAHM COMMEMORATION, FIRST DRAFT, AUGUST 3, 2004

THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY EXECUTIVE ORDER

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

______________________________________________________________________________

For Immediate Release

____________________

THE NATIVE AMERICAN HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL DAY

- - - - - - -

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION

The Native American Holocaust Memorial Day serves as a memorial to Native American Men, Women and Children that died or suffered or are suffering as a result of the Native American Holocaust. We define the Native American Holocaust as the systematic persecution and annihilation of Native American peoples through the colonization and assimilation process.

Millions of people indigenous to the borders of the United States of America died in the formation of our country. Today, in the United States, there are 7,876,568 Native American peoples of 562 federally recognized Nations.

The Memorial Day’s purpose is to advance and share the experience and knowledge of what this horror has meant for Native peoples today; to preserve the memory of those who died or suffered; to offer comfort, support, encouragement and understanding; and to encourage us all to reflect upon the need for dignity of and respect among all peoples. It is also to remind us of the consequences of silence in the face of prejudice and racism. Those who witness the abuse of Native peoples suffer trauma as profound as the victim of the abuse. It is this knowledge that will help us put an end to prejudice and racism.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, __________________________, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the last Saturday in April, as the Native American Holocaust Memorial Day. I call upon the people of the United States to observe the occasion with appropriate programs, ceremonies, and activities.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ____________ day of _____________________.

PRESIDENT _________________________

_______________________________

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EXECUTIVE ORDER ENDING USE OF NATIVE AMERICAN MASCOTS

THE WHITE HOUSE

Office of the Press Secretary

______________________________________________________________________________

For Immediate Release

____________________

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

AN ORDER

As President of the United States, I hereby adopt and ratify the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights call for an end to the use of Native American images and team names by non-Native schools and further extend it to include non-Native entities, including, but not limited to, institutions of higher learning, professional and non-professional sports teams, advertising agencies, corporations, and other business and legal entities that receive federal funding.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, __________________________, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby order an end to the use of Native American images and team names by non-Native schools and further extend it to include non-Native entities, including, but not limited to, institutions of higher learning, professional and non-professional sports teams, advertising agencies, corporations, and other business and legal entities that receive federal funding.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this ____________ day of _____________________.

PRESIDENT _________________________

_______________________________

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ELDER RESPECT

Native American Elders are the precious link that keeps our history alive for our children and us. Without them, their testimony, and their artifacts, Native and other peoples lose the opportunity for education and enrichment. Elders deserve a high degree of respect and care on our part and for this reason the Elder Respect program was established supporting inter-generational leadership and engaging in those activities that ensure the Native American community that their lives are honored commensurate with the enormity and gravity of the tragedy of the Native American Holocaust.

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DISCLAIMER

The Native American Holocaust Museum ("the NAHM") freely provides the information contained on this website to our website visitors. The Museum does not solicit or accept monetary contributions. It is written for adult use. Although the NAHM makes every reasonable effort to provide accurate information, the NAHM cannot guarantee the accuracy, reliability, currency, or completeness of the information contained on this website or on any other website with which it is linked. The NAHM therefore disclaims responsibility for any errors in the information provided, and the NAHM urges all visitors to this website to take their own steps to obtain independent verification of the information provided. In addition, the NAHM disclaims all warranties, including the implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, in regard to the information provided on this website.

COPYRIGHT

Text, images, art, audios and videos made available on the NAHM World Wide Web pages, created to provide an educational resource to the public, are the property of the NAHM or the individual artist and protected by copyright. The reproduction, redistribution and/or exploitation of any materials and/or content (data, text, images, marks or logos) for personal or commercial gain is not permitted. All parties using, printing or downloading the materials and/or content of the NAHM web pages in any manner represent and warrant (1) that they understand and will observe the limitations on the use of the materials and/or content; and (2) that they will not infringe or violate the rights of any other party.

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